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Emergency Contraception

What is emergency contraception?   Emergency contraception (EC) is used after unprotected sex to reduce the risk of pregnancy.                                           You might use emergency contraception if: you had sex and didn’t use any contraception a condom broke or slipped off during sex you missed one or more of your usual contraceptive pills  you were sexually assaulted What kind of emergency contraception is available? There are two types of emergency contraception available in Australia: The emergency contraceptive pills (ECP): the Levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive...

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High School Education

SHFPACT has developed a range of workshops and education sessions for students in High School and College. Sessions can be tailored to small or large groups of students, and to meet the needs of the student, school and parents/caregivers.Topics can include: Gender and Sexual Identity Respectful Relationships Consent Technology, Social Media and Pornography Contraception, STIs and BBVs For presentations to large groups of students, the cost is $190 per educator per hour. For workshops, the cost is $10 per student, per workshop (there is a discount available if a school books multiple...

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Contraception Kits

SHFPACT hires Contraception Kits to any High Schools and Colleges that have a Friends of SHFPACT Membership (Organisational/Nonprofit/Small Business/Schools). To take out a Friends of SHFPACT Membership follow the link below: Friends of SHFPACT Membership SHFPACT’s Contraception Kits contain: 1x diaphragm (Caya®) 1x hormone releasing IUD (Mirena®) 6 x male condoms 6 x lubricants 2 x female condoms 2 x dental dam 1 x oral contraception pill sample box 1 x emergency contraception sample box 1 x vaginal ring (Nuvaring®) 1 x contraceptive implant (Implanon®) 1 x contraceptive injection...

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Vasectomy

A vasectomy is a permanent form of contraception. It involves a simple surgical procedure that prevents sperm from traveling from the testicles to the semen ejaculated from the penis. After vasectomy, your semen is the same, but it has no sperm in it. Vasectomy is a safe, effective, and permanent form of contraception. How effective is vasectomy? A vasectomy is over 99% effective. However, while it is rare, a vasectomy may fail, and you may stay fertile or become fertile again. This can happen if the tubes are not entirely blocked off, grow back together, or if a third vas deferens tube exists....

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Early pregnancy health

Good health and care in pregnancy are essential for you and your baby and are especially important in early pregnancy. This information brochure outlines the key issues in early pregnancy health and care, and what to do next now that you are pregnant. When should I see a doctor?  Ideally, you should see a doctor before you become pregnant to discuss any tests you may need. You can also discuss any medical problems, medications, supplements, and general health in pregnancy. If this hasn’t happened because your pregnancy was unplanned or unexpected, then when you first find out you are pregnant...

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Post Natal Contraception

Contraception is essential for planning the size of your family and spacing children optimally for your individual family unit. A pregnancy that occurs within 12 months of giving birth can place extra stress on the mother and baby and carry more risks of complications, so having effective contraception during this time is particularly important. It can be a good idea to talk to your doctor about this before giving birth, as some contraceptive methods can be started soon after childbirth. Contraception is not needed in the first 3 weeks following childbirth, but ovulation (the release of an...

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Contraceptive Injection

WHAT IS THE CONTRACEPTIVE INJECTION? The contraceptive injection is a hormone injection that prevents pregnancy. It contains Depot Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (DMPA). DMPA is a progestogen that is similar to the hormone progesterone made by your body. DMPA has been available as a contraceptive method for many years. HOW IS IT GIVEN AND HOW OFTEN? The contraceptive injection is given by a doctor or nurse every 12 weeks in your upper arm or buttock. HOW DOES IT WORK? The contraceptive injection prevents ovulation (an egg being released from your ovary). It also thickens the mucus in your...

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HIV / AIDS

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) attacks the body’s immune system, and if it untreated, it can lead to AIDS. The virus that causes HIV is called a retrovirus. AIDS stands for acquired immune deficiency syndrome and is a late stage of untreated HIV. This is where the body’s immune system is damaged by the HIV virus making the infected person vulnerable to diseases and infections. With the HIV treatments that are now available in Australia, AIDS is extremely rare. How do you get HIV? HIV can be found in blood, semen, vaginal secretions, anal secretions, and breast milk. You can get HIV through: Sex...

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Pelvic Pain

What is pelvic pain? Pelvic pain is pain that occurs in the pelvic area. The pelvic area is the lower part of your abdomen below your belly button, above your legs, and between your hip bones. The pelvic area contains important organs such as your uterus (womb), ovaries, fallopian tubes, bowel, and bladder. What kinds of pelvic pain are there? There are many different types of pelvic pain. These include: Period pain Painful sex Pelvic muscle pain Vulval pain Bowel pain Bladder pain Chronic pelvic pain What causes pelvic pain? There are many different causes of pelvic pain. Sometimes...

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Contraceptive Implant (The Rod)

WHAT IS THE CONTRACEPTIVE IMPLANT? The contraceptive implant, often called ‘the rod,’ is a small flexible plastic rod that contains a progestogen hormone called etonogestrel. It is inserted under the skin on the underside of your upper arm, where it slowly releases a small amount of this hormone over 3 years. The contraceptive implant used in Australia is called Implanon NXT. HOW DOES IT WORK? The contraceptive implant prevents pregnancy by stopping eggs from being released from the ovary (ovulation). It also increases mucus thickness in the cervix, making it hard for sperm to travel through...

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Chlamydia

What is chlamydia? Chlamydia is a very common sexually transmissible infection (STI) which is caused by a bacterium called chlamydia trachomatis. It is the most common bacterial STI in young people under 30 in Australia.  Chlamydia is easy to catch, easy to test, and easy to treat. It can cause infection of the cervix, anus, throat, urethra(penis), and occasionally the eyes. How do you get chlamydia? You get chlamydia by having sex without a condom with a person who has the infection. Chlamydia is sometimes also transmitted through oral sex.  Is a chlamydia infection serious? If chlamydia...

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Contraceptive Options

WHAT IS CONTRACEPTION? Contraception means prevention of pregnancy. There are a number of different methods of contraception available. It is important to choose a method that best suits your needs at the time. Using contraception gives you more control, allows you to decide if, and when, to have children, and allows you to enjoy sex without having to worry about an unplanned pregnancy. WHICH CONTRACEPTIVE IS RIGHT FOR ME? Many factors may affect your choice of a contraceptive method including: How effective the method is Your stage of life Your lifestyle Ease of use of the method Any...

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